Posts

Welding Band Saw Blades

MSC blade welder 003

 

A week or two ago I changed the tires on my Delta 14″ band saw, and it gave me so much available horsepower that the ragged blade that I had flipped off the wheels WAY too many times just took a dump. I had a situation where the band saw was ready to run, but the tank was empty. I didn’t have any blades for the saw. Time to fix that. A year or two ago I had bought myself an MSC blade welder (circa 1984) to feed my three band saws, and a few rolls of coil stock. The welder worked initially, and then developed some problems (like most all my tools), I figured it wouldn’t be too tough to fix. I had invested a couple of hours to clean my bench off, and tonight was the night to square it away.

 

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New Tires For The Delta Band Saw (and Ongoing Improvements)

saw and switches 033About a year ago I bought a Delta 14″ wood and metal cutting band saw at a pretty decent price (here it is fresh off the truck). I hadn’t found any dual speed saws in my area, and had to make a three hour trip to Pennsylvania to pick it up. Thats the price for living near the nation’s Capitol; there isn’t alot of old iron around unless you rub elbows with the type of clowns I do. This saw worked pretty well, but I tend to push the limits of good judgement when it comes to my tools. I had bought this saw to “replace” my Silver 20″ saw, because I need more floor space. The Delta hasn’t learned how to earn its keep yet, and I still have the Silver. The main problem I have (had) with the Delta was that it would throw the blade when I pushed it a little. It was getting annoying, and a while back I bought a set of Urethane tires from Sulphur Grove Tools. I bought mine from their Ebay store (Ebay ID: ohioblademan). I think the set was about 25 bucks, and they carry Fenner Power-Twist segmented belts too (a real boon to anybody that messes with old machines). The tires laid around for about six months before I got tired of moving them. Tonight I decided to throw them on.

 

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Chinese Lubricants; Its Just Oil, Right? (Oy Vey!)

As one might expect, I tend to get involved in alot of discussions about machine tool lubrication on different forums (against my better judgement). My views are VERY CLEAR: buy good stuff for your machine tools, and they will love you long time. PERIOD.

The other night I posted some sources for the ROY DEAN  DE112 grease for the cone pulley and back gear on the South Bend Lathes on the South Bend Lathes group on Yahoo. This is the grease that SBL recommended as the lubricant for these parts when it was determined that the oil points were not being lubricated on a daily basis.  I always wondered why some lathes were marked “OIL”, and some marked “GREASE” on the cone pulley and back gear. It is my IMPRESSION (because I have no facts to back it up) that the parts marked OIL and GREASE are identical, just the lubrication requirements are different. It was felt that in production shops that the lathes weren’t being lubed with oil every day, so SBL changed the lube to the ROY DEAN DE112 grease applied ONCE A YEAR. Their feeling was that that should provide enough protection to the cone pulley and back gear. Thanks to Jim B from the Yahoo South Bend Lathe users group for that tid bit. I have to believe that SBL spent a little time and money researching what grade and viscosity of grease or oil would work best in this application. Their word is good enough for me.

 

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Milling Machine Vise Overhaul – Garvin #13 for United States Machine Tool Horizontal Milling Machine

Sometimes you get a machine and start using it, and it just ain’t right. I have been using the USMT #1 for a while, and have found the mill to be very versatile, I hadn’t been real pleased with either of the two vises I’ve had on it. Theres nothing better than busting your knuckles on a vise thats too big, or having a part fly out of a vise thats too small.  The first vise I had on the mill was a Palmgren which was nice, but I didn’t trust it to hold big pieces when I was taking big cuts. I got a 6 inch Bridgeport vise which held my work much more securely, but stuck out far enough towards the operator, that you had to be careful or you would lose skin off your knuckles when operating the hand lever. This really got bad when I put the handwheel adapter on the machine, so the big vise had to go. TRY to find a 5 inch vise for a milling machine!

 

saw and switches 006

 

 

Luckily, the CAMS Yard Sale was just around the corner. This is a place where you can trade your surplus machine tool stuff for new surplus stuff from somebody else. Every year I come back home with the same amount of “stuff” as I left home with, its just new stuff. I brought the Palmgren down with me, sold that and bought this beauty.

 

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South Bend Lathe Recommended A B C Oils

South Bend Lathe A B C Oils

Most machine tool manufacturers have very specific performance standards for the care and feeding of their products to insure accuracy and long service life. In the South Bend Lathe publication; “How to Run a Lathe”, which is considered by many people to be the last word on the care and operation of the South Bend lathe, the use of “A, B and C Oils” were recommended. These are lubricants that fall into specific viscosity ranges, or have particular qualities. Judging by the amount of “survivor” South Bends on the market today, the recommended oils were more than adequate. In researching the current types of lubricants that have been developed in the last century, I found out that the oils originally called for in “the Bible” are still available, and in fact very competative in terms of performance.

I’ll be discussing only the Mobil line of lubricants, as that is what I have chosen to sell in the BlueChipStore. I chose them for availablity, quality, and cost. My reasoning was that buyers would want an ample supply of a time tested product at a fair price. Mobil lubricants fit the bill.

 

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