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“How much is a Bridgeport Mill Worth?”

 

 

work for cold beer

 

I get alot of questions about what different machines are  worth, and to be honest; unless you are standing right next to a machine, it’s tough to say. About the best I can tell most guys is the most important factors are: Location, Condition and Tooling. Thats not much help to anybody that is looking to buy a new toy. The other day I got a note from a site viewer that made me aware of just how many aspects there are to the fine art of buying a machine, and how badly I missed the mark on just ONE of the considerations when I replied to his inquiry. Heres the Email:

 

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Posted in: Bridgeport, bridgeport milling machine, Future Projects, Maintenance, rebuild, shop equipment, south bend lathe

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Cleaning Up My New “Albrecht” Yard Sale Chuck

keyless chuck 001

 

Yesterday at the CAMS Yard Sale, I parked my truck and made a frantic dash for the sellers tables before I unloaded all my stuff to start selling. This was one of the first items that caught my eye.  I had a decent size keyless chuck on my want list for a while, and there it was, and on an R8 arbor, to boot! I picked it up and it looked to be in good working condition, but maybe a little banged up, but it was an Albrecht! I started doing the rebuild in my mind before I even asked the price, and was shocked when Chris told me $40. Thats a hell of a deal for a 5/8 Albrecht chuck on an R8 arbor, and I didn’t think it would be wise to question the deal and happily paid him and went on taking some pictures.

 

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Posted in: Bridgeport, bridgeport milling machine, CAMS Yard Sale, Maintenance, rebuild, shop equipment, south bend lathe

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Milling Machine Vise Overhaul – Garvin #13 for United States Machine Tool Horizontal Milling Machine

Sometimes you get a machine and start using it, and it just ain’t right. I have been using the USMT #1 for a while, and have found the mill to be very versatile, I hadn’t been real pleased with either of the two vises I’ve had on it. Theres nothing better than busting your knuckles on a vise thats too big, or having a part fly out of a vise thats too small.  The first vise I had on the mill was a Palmgren which was nice, but I didn’t trust it to hold big pieces when I was taking big cuts. I got a 6 inch Bridgeport vise which held my work much more securely, but stuck out far enough towards the operator, that you had to be careful or you would lose skin off your knuckles when operating the hand lever. This really got bad when I put the handwheel adapter on the machine, so the big vise had to go. TRY to find a 5 inch vise for a milling machine!

 

saw and switches 006

 

 

Luckily, the CAMS Yard Sale was just around the corner. This is a place where you can trade your surplus machine tool stuff for new surplus stuff from somebody else. Every year I come back home with the same amount of “stuff” as I left home with, its just new stuff. I brought the Palmgren down with me, sold that and bought this beauty.

 

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Posted in: Bridgeport, Burke horizontal mill, Future Projects, Maintenance, rebuild, shop equipment, Southbend

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Fixing a Chinese Arbor Press (or Polishing a Turd)

Fixing a Chinese Arbor Press (or Polishing a Turd)

I’ve had a couple of projects lingering around here longer than normal, waiting for some press work, and decided tonight to get to work. A while back I bought a cheap 3 ton arbor press from a new (to me) supplier. From the price, it was obviously Chinese, and I knew it was bound to be a project from jump street. I wasn’t really prepared for what I got. To be fair; the company I bought it from (which will remain nameless) disassembled the press and shipped it in two boxes, so that it would meet the UPS 80 LB limit, which was good of them as it saved me a big chunk of change. I was so bummed by the quality of the press that it has sat un-used for about six months; crude would be an understatement. The casting looks like it was cleaned up by an epileptic with a chainsaw. The first time I tried to use it, the drawbar slipped in the ratchet and d@mn near knocked me out. I stuffed the turd in the corner and started looking at other options, and my projects I had bought it for sat on the shelf. I had a nice hand wheel that I wanted to mount to my horizontal mill and a $100 broach to cut the 3/8″ square hole, and no press to do it with. Tonight I decided to fix the problem. Heres a look at the ratchet ring that came on the press.

 

 

You can see that the problem is that the gear was cut with more than a 90 degree step in it, and the ratchet cog would slip right off of it. I had to get a step that would capture the cog better. I figured the best way to do that was just under-cut the ratchet tooth with a dovetail cutter. The only cutter I had was a 60 degree (would have been better off with a 45), but I figured there was enough meat there so I gave it a try.

 

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Posted in: arbor press, Bridgeport, broaching, Burke horizontal mill, Maintenance, rebuild, shop equipment, Southbend

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How Old Is My Bridgeport Milling Machine?

I’ve seen this question asked on a number of users groups over the years, and thought a better question would be: “Where are the serial numbers that date my Bridgeport mill?”. It seems that most new owners try and look up the numbers on the head itself.

THIS IS NOT THE NUMBER THAT DATES YOUR MACHINE!
——————————————————

THIS IS THE ONE YOU ARE LOOKING FOR
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The serial number for your machine is on the front of the knee, behind the bearing retainer for the cross feed screw. You may have to slide the saddle slightly to the rear of the machine, as the way covers may hide the serial numbers if the saddle is in the forward position.
If you plug the serial number into the chart below, it will give you the year of manufacture of your machine. Be advised; while most machines will spend their entire lives in one piece, many a milling machine has a later, or earlier head swapped onto it. This chart is to date the basic machine.

BH-1 THRU BH-39 Round ram 1938
BH-40 THRU BH-252 1939
BH-253 THRU BH-656 1940
BH-657 THRU BH-1549 1941
BH-1550 THRU BH-2943 1942
BH-2044 THRU BH-4105 1943
BH-4106 THRU BH-4997 1944
BH-4998 THRU BH-5930 1945
BH-5931 THRU BH-7235 1946
BH-7236 THRU BH-8814 1947
BH-8815 THRU BH-10381 1948
BH-10382 THRU BH-11378 1949
BH-11379 THRU BH-11379 1950
BH-12751 THRU BH-14489 1951
BH-14490 THRU BH-16700 1952
BH-16701 THRU BH-19367 1953
BH-19368 THRU BH-22732 1954
BH-22733 THRU BH-26962 1955
BR-26963-THRU BR-31618 Start of V ram 1956
BR-31619 THRU BR-37278 1957
BR-37279 THRU BR-42110 1958
BR-42111 THRU BR-46938 1959
BR-46939 THRU BR-52598 1960
BR-52599 THRU BR-58552 1961
BR-58553 THRU BR-64987 1962
BR-64988 THRU BR-71981 1963
BR-71982 THRU BR-79538 1964
BR-75939 THRU BR-88180 1965
BR-88181 THRU BR-98089 1966
BR-98090 THRU BR-108351 1967
BR-108352 THRU 118640 1968
BR-118641 THRU 131778 1969
BR-131779 THRU BR-138139 1970
BR-138640 THRU BR-143350 1971
BR-143351 THRU BR-149294 1972
BR-149295 THRU BR-157909 1973
BR-157910 THRU BR-167652 1974
BR-167653 THRU BR-174083 1975
BR-174084 THRU BR-180697 1976
BR-180698 THRU BR-188559 1977
BR-188560 THRU BR-196987 1978
BR-196988 THRU BR-206296 1979
BR-206297 THRU BR-216473 1980
BR-216474 THRU BR-227523 1981
BR-227524 THRU BR-231700 1982
BR-231701 THRU BR-235985 1983
BR-235986 THRU BR-241350 1984
BR-241351 THRU BR-245659 1985
BR-246660 THRU BR-248551 1986
BR-248552 THRU BR-250531 1987
BR-250532 THRU BR-252874 1988
BR-252875 THRU BR-255463 1989
BR-255464 THRU BR-257888 1990
BR-257889 THRU BR-259897 1991
BR-257898 THRU BR-262188 1992
BR-262189 THRU BP-264586 1993
BR-264587 THRU BR-267635 1994

 

Usually, in the front of the knee by the serial number, you will find a “BR” logo.

A 12-BR will indicate 12 inches of table travel. You will find this on most J heads.

A “BR” with no numeral will indicate that 9 inches of travel (an early model).

 

I will update this list as info becomes available.

Please have a look at the and let BlueChipMachineShop.com provide your special maintenance and tool needs..

Posted in: Bridgeport, Free Download

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