Roy Dean DE-112 Grease and the Modern Equivalent

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One of the most frequent question I get from my customers is if I carry Roy Dean DE-112 grease (as specified in the SBL Lube Chart). This chart dates back to when cars had running boards, and some of the lube requirements are somewhat out-of-date. the Roy Dean grease IS still available through Steve Wells @ the SBL workshop at www.wswells.com, and Steve Brooks at stevewb on Ebay. These guys have THE LAST remaining inventory of the Roy Dean grease, and have told me when its gone, there won’t be another production run. Get some now, if you want it! This led me to look around for a modern alternative, and I have come up with a reasonable substitute. But lets look at the history of Roy Dean grease first:

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Chinese Lubricants; Its Just Oil, Right? (Oy Vey!)

As one might expect, I tend to get involved in alot of discussions about machine tool lubrication on different forums (against my better judgement). My views are VERY CLEAR: buy good stuff for your machine tools, and they will love you long time. PERIOD.

The other night I posted some sources for the ROY DEAN  DE112 grease for the cone pulley and back gear on the South Bend Lathes on the South Bend Lathes group on Yahoo. This is the grease that SBL recommended as the lubricant for these parts when it was determined that the oil points were not being lubricated on a daily basis.  I always wondered why some lathes were marked “OIL”, and some marked “GREASE” on the cone pulley and back gear. It is my IMPRESSION (because I have no facts to back it up) that the parts marked OIL and GREASE are identical, just the lubrication requirements are different. It was felt that in production shops that the lathes weren’t being lubed with oil every day, so SBL changed the lube to the ROY DEAN DE112 grease applied ONCE A YEAR. Their feeling was that that should provide enough protection to the cone pulley and back gear. Thanks to Jim B from the Yahoo South Bend Lathe users group for that tid bit. I have to believe that SBL spent a little time and money researching what grade and viscosity of grease or oil would work best in this application. Their word is good enough for me.

 

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Milling Machine Vise Overhaul – Garvin #13 for United States Machine Tool Horizontal Milling Machine

Sometimes you get a machine and start using it, and it just ain’t right. I have been using the USMT #1 for a while, and have found the mill to be very versatile, I hadn’t been real pleased with either of the two vises I’ve had on it. Theres nothing better than busting your knuckles on a vise thats too big, or having a part fly out of a vise thats too small.  The first vise I had on the mill was a Palmgren which was nice, but I didn’t trust it to hold big pieces when I was taking big cuts. I got a 6 inch Bridgeport vise which held my work much more securely, but stuck out far enough towards the operator, that you had to be careful or you would lose skin off your knuckles when operating the hand lever. This really got bad when I put the handwheel adapter on the machine, so the big vise had to go. TRY to find a 5 inch vise for a milling machine!

 

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Luckily, the CAMS Yard Sale was just around the corner. This is a place where you can trade your surplus machine tool stuff for new surplus stuff from somebody else. Every year I come back home with the same amount of “stuff” as I left home with, its just new stuff. I brought the Palmgren down with me, sold that and bought this beauty.

 

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Fixing a Chinese Arbor Press (or Polishing a Turd)

I’ve had a couple of projects lingering around here longer than normal, waiting for some press work, and decided tonight to get to work. A while back I bought a cheap 3 ton arbor press from a new (to me) supplier. From the price, it was obviously Chinese, and I knew it was bound to be a project from jump street. I wasn’t really prepared for what I got. To be fair; the company I bought it from (which will remain nameless) disassembled the press and shipped it in two boxes, so that it would meet the UPS 80 LB limit, which was good of them as it saved me a big chunk of change. I was so bummed by the quality of the press that it has sat un-used for about six months; crude would be an understatement. The casting looks like it was cleaned up by an epileptic with a chainsaw. The first time I tried to use it, the drawbar slipped in the ratchet and d@mn near knocked me out. I stuffed the turd in the corner and started looking at other options, and my projects I had bought it for sat on the shelf. I had a nice hand wheel that I wanted to mount to my horizontal mill and a $100 broach to cut the 3/8″ square hole, and no press to do it with. Tonight I decided to fix the problem. Heres a look at the ratchet ring that came on the press.

 

 

You can see that the problem is that the gear was cut with more than a 90 degree step in it, and the ratchet cog would slip right off of it. I had to get a step that would capture the cog better. I figured the best way to do that was just under-cut the ratchet tooth with a dovetail cutter. The only cutter I had was a 60 degree (would have been better off with a 45), but I figured there was enough meat there so I gave it a try.

 

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South Bend Lathe Recommended A B C Oils

South Bend Lathe A B C Oils

Most machine tool manufacturers have very specific performance standards for the care and feeding of their products to insure accuracy and long service life. In the South Bend Lathe publication; “How to Run a Lathe”, which is considered by many people to be the last word on the care and operation of the South Bend lathe, the use of “A, B and C Oils” were recommended. These are lubricants that fall into specific viscosity ranges, or have particular qualities. Judging by the amount of “survivor” South Bends on the market today, the recommended oils were more than adequate. In researching the current types of lubricants that have been developed in the last century, I found out that the oils originally called for in “the Bible” are still available, and in fact very competative in terms of performance.

I’ll be discussing only the Mobil line of lubricants, as that is what I have chosen to sell in the BlueChipStore. I chose them for availablity, quality, and cost. My reasoning was that buyers would want an ample supply of a time tested product at a fair price. Mobil lubricants fit the bill.

 

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